Beating Anxiety



Be The Warrior Not The Worrier - Fighting Anxiety & Fear | Angela Ceberano | TEDxBedminster





Even with all the preventative medicine in the world, most panic attack sufferers will experience attacks from time to time. They will most likely not be that serious, but they will happen. So what occurs during a panic attack? When a person panics, the body is essentially triggering a “fight or flight” response to the source of the attack. 

Children experience emotional issues such as panic and anxiety much differently than adults, so education is as important as anything when dealing with this situation. Children and teenagers experience panic attacks and often develop fears of going places because of this. They fear that should they engage in an activity, a panic attack may occur and embarrass them. 

The structure of the brain and its process are inherited in totality and that can be another reason why people with chemical imbalance can pass on the anxiety disorder thus, being the cause of anxiety attack. Also growing up as a child in an abusive home, where the family expressed anxiety and violence constantly can be the cause of anxiety attack. 

These episodes can last minutes, sometimes even hours, and can be very disabling to most people as they essentially can freeze a person like a “deer in the headlights”. Being paralyzed by fear is a very real notion to those that suffer with panic attacks on a regular basis. The Cause The cause for a panic attack is not usually obvious, but it is something that is generally “normal” as a part of a regular stressful modern life. 

Another option that some sufferers choose to help control panic attack symptoms is to actually face the fears. For some, gradually confronting the situations that cause panic can help eradicate them. There is method to this treatment, and it should be undertaken under the care of a physician or therapist so as not to aggravate the problem. 

Anxiety is also closely related to (but not the cause of) a condition called mitral valve prolapse or MVP. Panic attacks generate a common human response to danger: the “fight or flight” response. This was said to evolve from early human types that either fled danger or took it on if they could.