Beating Anxiety



What Having Anxiety Feels Like





The heart races, the blood quickens, the eyes function differently, senses are heightened, and other parts of the body begin to react in other ways such as muscles tightening, etc. Anxiety attack heart difficulties can arise from the heart being told to work too fast by the brain, which is in charge of the “fight or flight” mechanism. 

It can cause people to withdraw indoors and avoid social activities for reasons involving fear. An anxiety attack, conversely, is an unexpected episode that usually involves fear as oppose to an overwhelming feeling. A sign of anxiety attack can be anything from irregular heartbeats to chest pain. They also include: shaking, twitching, trembling, hot flashes, chills, “rubber legs”, tingling in extremities, difficulty sleeping, unpredictable sleeping patterns, body tension, aches and pains, sweating, clamminess, and stomach problems such as nausea or “butterflies”. 

Genetics Anxiety disorders are also inherited as they tend to run in the family, thus passing it on from one’s mother/father to the son/daughter or any other close relative. The structure of the brain and its process are inherited in totality and that can be another reason why people with chemical imbalance can pass on the anxiety disorder thus, being the cause of anxiety attack. 

Add in an already depressed view of the world, a worry that others find no worth in you, and you have a recipe for one miserable person. Health care professionals are learning that the instances of panic attack and depression coinciding together are more common that thought. While not everyone who is depressed will have panic attacks, many people who suffer from panic may very well be depressed. 

In reality, there is not a particular known reason for people who experience these attacks, they are in short a body’s way of dealing with an overwhelming feeling in one way or another. Some Symptoms of an Anxiety Attack One of the main symptoms of an anxiety attack is extreme fear. Now, fear may be acknowledged as a symptom of anxiety, but in reality it is just the end result of the real symptoms. 

Odds are if you are reading this then that is the case. Like most panic attack sufferers you are probably asking yourself two questions; why me? Is there a cure? Unfortunately, there is no cure for chronic panic attacks. Most panic attack sufferers will have the potential to have attacks their whole life.